Digital Citizenship

Digital Conduct

Take our survey on cyberbullying

Should I share that unflattering photo of my friend on Facebook?  

Is it okay to download a song I don’t have rights to?

Is this news or just gossip?

The online world constantly calls upon us to make ethical decisions like these. Choosing consciously about what action to take will help you embrace the digital world. Furthermore, engaging positively can help create a positive digital world.

The first step to becoming a good digital citizen is knowing your digital world.

A good digital citizen is a person with the skills and knowledge to effectively use digital technologies to participate in society, communicate with others and create and consume digital content.

By taking ownership in on-line communities, it is expected that we will act more responsibly.

The three core principles that responsible digital citizens should practice are:

  • ENGAGE positively
  • KNOW your online world
  • CHOOSE consciously

Digital Conduct

Using any online services isn’t a ‘right’, it’s a privilege extended to people under specific conditions laid out by the organisations that own and operate these services.

Facebook, Twitter, Google, Instagram and even JCU, all set out expected behaviours for digital citizens using their technology platforms. These behaviours are generally communicated in terms of service or acceptable use agreements. Just because a service is free (or provided at no cost) does not mean the people who use the service are entirely free to do anything they want on it.

The Student Conduct Policy is JCU’s own policy that outlines the principles that are expected of JCU students, in both the physical classroom as well as the digital classroom.

At the heart of the Policy is the principle that students must not engage in any conduct that impairs the reasonable freedom of other persons to pursue their studies, research, duties or lawful activities in the University or to participate in the life of the University.

Applying this to the digital world can be complex. Knowing when and how to engage, and respond is important in ensuring appropriate conduct.

Web 2.0 tools, such as, Facebook, Twitter, Google, Instagram and even JCU, set out expected behaviours for digital citizens using their technology platforms.

These expected behaviours are generally communicated in terms of service or acceptable use agreements. It is important to be aware that, even if a service is provided at no cost, peo- ple using the service cannot to anything they want on it.

JCU Acceptable Use Policy:  https://www.jcu.edu.au/policy/information-and-communications-technology/information-communication-technology-acceptable-use-policy

The Student Conduct Policy is JCU’s own policy that outlines the principles that are expected of JCU students, in both the physical classroom as well as the digital classroom.

At the heart of the Policy is the principle that students must not engage in any conduct that impairs the reasonable free- dom of other persons to pursue their studies, research, duties or lawful activities in the University or to participate in the life of the University (JCU, 2015).

Knowing when and how to engage, in the blended environment is important in ensuring ethical, responsible and respectful behaviour.

Student Conduct Policy: https://www.jcu.edu.au/policy/student-services/student-conduct-policy

Digital Conduct Tips

  • Navigating conflict is not easy in a digital world. The conversation must be to both talk and listen – in effect, establishing a dialogue with the digital community.
  • If you are being cyberbullied, you can avoid retaliating or responding by blocking the person or changing your privacy settings.

 

Digital Conduct Activity

Locate and read the JCU Student Code of Conduct.  Take time to reflect on your own digital conduct and how it relates to the Code. Is there anything about past conduct that you would change? Why? Who Not?

 

Digital Conduct Activity

Using the Student Conduct Policy complete the following activity:

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